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I watched this TEDx talk by Mark Mattson, the current Chief of the Laboratory of Neuroscience at the National Institute on Ageing. It demonstrates some interesting details about fasting and why it isn’t as common as it should be.

Many research studies are demonstrating its advantages. This article highlights 10 evidence-based health advantages of fasting that research has demonstrated. These include weight loss, decreased blood pressure and lowered cholesterol. But the truly fascinating question is, why won’t the pharmaceutical industry research it? 

Here is a part of Mark Mattson’s talk which hints at these problems: “Why is it that the ordinary diet is three meals a day plus snacks? It isn’t that it’s the healthiest eating pattern, now that’s my opinion but I think there is a lot of evidence to support that. There are a lot of pressures to have that eating pattern, there’s a lot of money involved. The food industry — are they going to make money from skipping breakfast like I did today? No, they’re going to lose money. If people fast, the food industry loses money. What about the pharmaceutical industries? What if people do some intermittent fasting, exercise regularly and are very healthy, is the pharmaceutical industry going to earn any money on healthy people?” Please watch and share so we can discuss issues about our eating habits and how we can become more healthy. To further prove the benefits of fasting, here is a quote from an author from The Power of Ideas who experienced intermittent fasting for one month: “Intermittent fasting has now become my way of life. It feels so great and I see myself being clear and concentrated. My energy levels have risen. I used to always get that afternoon slump when I felt tired at about 3 PM, but I don’t feel this anymore. Eating has also come to be an experience that’s enjoyed, rather than just food to scoff down as fast as possible. This has made it simple to keep intermittent fasting going. Also, after a couple weeks, I decided to try exercising (running and weights) as soon as I woke up on an empty stomach. I thought I would feel light headed and faint from working out on an empty stomach, but the truth is, I had more grit and energy. Studies have demonstrated that there’s major perks to doing this: apparently it’s meant to supercharge your body’s fat-burning potential.”

Article byDemi Powell