Sprint Relay | Core Spirit
February 17

Sprint Relay

The point of the 4 x 100 meters run transfer is, with the help of four competitors, to convey a twirly doo (30 cm long, 13 cm in perimeter and no under 50grms in weight) around 400 meters as fast as could be expected.


MALLET TRADE


The guidelines of transfer rivalry require the cudgel to be traded inside a 20 meters change-over zone. With the goal that the active sprinter can accomplish most extreme speeding up at rod trade, the competitor can initiate his/her run 10 meters before the change-over zone. The mallet trade ought to happen 5 meters before the finish of the change-over zone. Along these lines, every competitor needs to run in excess of 100 meters:


      • first competitor 105 meters

      • second and third competitors 125 meters

      • fourth competitor 120 meters


HAND-OFF TAKEOVER  ZONE CHANGE FROM 1 APRIL 2018


Rule 170.3. In the 4 x 100m and the 4 x 200m transfers and for the first and second trades in the Medley Relay, every takeover zone will be 30m long, of which the scratch line is 20m from the beginning of the zone. For the third change in the Medley Relay and the 4 x 400m and longer transfers, every takeover zone will be 20m long of which the scratch line is the middle.


The speeding up zone has been wiped out for the 4 x 100m and 4 x 200m transfers. These zones have been converged into one takeover zone 30m long. Until the old markings are refreshed, the takeover zone will start at the current line denoting the beginning of the speeding up zone. The scratch line stays in a similar spot however is presently 20m after the start of the zone.


CHECKMARK


The trading of the implement requires a coordinating of the rates of the approaching and active competitors so they are together towards the finish of the change-over zone. This requires the active sprinter to initiate his/her run when the approaching sprinter arrives at a checkmark. The distance of the checkmark from the beginning of the zone needs to mull over the:


      • running velocity of the approaching sprinter

      • response and speeding up limit of the active sprinter


Coming up next is an overall guide on the distance of the checkmark from the active sprinter's beginning stage:


      • Men - 7 to 9 meters

      • Ladies - 6 to 7 meters

      • Kids - 5 to 6 meters


 A MORE PRECISE FIGURING OF THE CHECKMARK


Severe correspondence of velocities by the active competitor and the approaching competitor inside the passing zone is a fundamental state of a fruitful change-over. Therefore, the ideal relationship of velocities of the competitors in the passing zone might be accomplished utilizing an accurately determined checkmark.


Settling on the situation of the checkmark is an indispensable part of hand-off running procedure. For this, we put on the running track before the zone a checkmark. The snapshot of intersection the checkmark by the approaching competitor is the sign for the active competitor to begin running.


The technique for choosing the situation of the checkmark starts with building up the specific spot of twirly doo trade (25 meters into the zone). We need to decide the:


      • time the active competitor takes to run 25m from a standing or altered squat beginning, for example 3.24 seconds

      • time it takes the approaching competitor to run the last 25m of their leg, for example 2.25 seconds

      • distinction for the two competitors, for example 3.24 - 2.25 = 0.99 seconds

      • normal speed of approaching competitor in the course of the last 25 meters, for example 25 ÷ 2.25 = 11.11 m/s.


With the distinction as expected (0.99 secs) and the approaching competitor normal speed (11.11m/s) we can work out the checkmark as 11.11 x 0.99 = 10.99m


The response of the active competitor to the approaching competitor hitting the checkmark likewise should be mulled over. Examinations with top-class competitors show that this response time is +0.20 seconds. When the active competitor initiates their running the approaching competitor will have voyaged 0.20 x 11.11 m/s = 2.22 meters which will mean the active competitor will start from a more limited beginning of 10.99 - 2.22 = 8.77m as opposed to the determined 10.99m. The checkmark, subsequently, should be set at 10.99 + 2.22 = 13.21m


FIGURE THE CHECKMARK


Enter the approaching competitor's the ideal opportunity for a flying 25 meters and the active competitor's standing beginning time for 25 meters and afterward select the 'Figure' catch to acquire an anticipated checkmark estimation.


RUNNING LINE AND ROD TRADE


The running situation in the path and trade of the cudgel for every individual from the transfer group is as per the following:


      • the main sprinter conveys the cudgel in the correct hand and runs within the path

      • the subsequent sprinter takes the twirly doo in the left hand and runs nearer to the outside of the path

       • the third sprinter takes the mallet in the correct hand and runs near within the path

      • the fourth sprinter takes the implement in the left hand


The trade is 'non-visual'. When the active competitor has seen the approaching competitor arrive at the checkmark, he/she will begin as though responding to the beginning weapon in a run race. The approaching competitor will call 'Hand' when he/she is in a situation to securely pass the cudgel to the active competitor. The active competitor returns his/her hand, the approaching competitor puts the cudgel into the hand, and the trade is finished. The active competitor doesn't watch the stick into his/her hand, henceforth 'non-visual'.


RUN RELAY


The point of the 4 x 100 meters run hand-off is, with the help of four competitors, to convey a stick (30 cm long, 13 cm in boundary and no under 50grms in weight) around 400 meters as fast as could really be expected.


CUDGEL TRADE


The guidelines of hand-off rivalry require the mallet to be traded inside a 20 meters change-over zone. So the active sprinter can accomplish greatest increasing speed at implement trade, the competitor can begin his/her run 10 meters before the change-over zone. The implement trade ought to happen 5 meters before the finish of the change-over zone. Along these lines, every competitor needs to run in excess of 100 meters:


      • first competitor 105 meters

      • second and third competitors 125 meters

      • fourth competitor 120 meters


TRANSFER TAKEOVER ZONE CHANGE FROM 1 APRRIL 2018


Rule 170.3. In the 4 x 100m and the 4 x 200m transfers and for the first and second trades in the Medley Relay, every takeover zone will be 30m long, of which the scratch line is 20m from the beginning of the zone. For the third change in the Medley Relay and the 4 x 400m and longer transfers, every takeover zone will be 20m long of which the scratch line is the middle.


The speeding up zone has been killed for the 4 x 100m and 4 x 200m transfers. These zones have been converged into one takeover zone 30m long. Until the old markings are refreshed, the takeover zone will start at the current line denoting the beginning of the quickening zone. The scratch line stays in a similar spot yet is currently 20m after the start of the zone.


 RUNNING TRACK CHANGEOVER ZONES


Checkmark


The trading of the stick requires a coordinating of the rates of the approaching and active competitors so they are together towards the finish of the change-over zone. This requires the active sprinter to start his/her run when the approaching sprinter arrives at a checkmark. The distance of the checkmark from the beginning of the zone needs to think about the:


      • running rate of the approaching sprinter

      • response and quickening limit of the active sprinter


Coming up next is an overall guide on the distance of the checkmark from the active sprinter's beginning stage:


      • Men - 7 to 9 meters

      • Ladies - 6 to 7 meters

      • Kids - 5 to 6 meters


 A MORE PRECISE FIGURING OF THE CHECKMARK


Severe correspondence of velocities by the active competitor and the approaching competitor inside the passing zone is a fundamental state of a fruitful change-over. Thusly, the ideal relationship of rates of the competitors in the passing zone might be accomplished utilizing an exactly determined checkmark.


Settling on the situation of the checkmark is a fundamental part of transfer running method. For this, we put on the running track before the zone a checkmark. The snapshot of intersection the checkmark by the approaching competitor is the sign for the active competitor to begin running.

The technique for choosing the situation of the checkmark starts with building up the specific spot of twirly doo trade (25 meters into the zone). We need to decide the:


      • time the active competitor takes to run 25m from a standing or adjusted hunker start, for example 3.24 seconds

      • time it takes the approaching competitor to run the last 25m of their leg, for example 2.25 seconds

      • distinction for the two competitors, for example 3.24 - 2.25 = 0.99 seconds

      • normal speed of approaching competitor in the course of the last 25 meters, for example 25 ÷ 2.25 = 11.11 m/s.


With the distinction as expected (0.99 secs) and the approaching competitor normal speed (11.11m/s) we can work out the checkmark as 11.11 x 0.99 = 10.99m


The response of the active competitor to the approaching competitor hitting the checkmark likewise should be mulled over. Examinations with top-class competitors show that this response time is +0.20 seconds. When the active competitor initiates their running the approaching competitor will have voyaged 0.20 x 11.11 m/s = 2.22 meters which will mean the active competitor will start from a more limited beginning of 10.99 - 2.22 = 8.77m as opposed to the determined 10.99m. The checkmark, consequently, should be put at 10.99 + 2.22 = 13.21m


Figure the checkmark


Enter the approaching competitor's the ideal opportunity for a flying 25 meters and the active competitor's standing beginning time for 25 meters and afterward select the 'Compute' catch to get an anticipated checkmark estimation.


      • Approaching competitor's the ideal opportunity for 25m seconds

      • Active competitor's the ideal opportunity for 25m seconds

      • Checkmark distance meters

      • In the event that the checkmark is a negative worth, at that point check the entered competitor's occasions are right

      • I would expect the approaching competitor's an ideal opportunity to be quicker than the active competitor's time

      • Running line and stick trade


The running situation in the path and trade of the implement for every individual from the transfer group is as per the following:


      • the primary sprinter conveys the twirly doo in the correct hand and runs within the path

      • the subsequent sprinter takes the twirly doo in the left hand and runs nearer to the outside of the path

      • the third sprinter takes the mallet in the correct hand and runs near within the path

      • the fourth sprinter takes the implement in the left hand


The trade is 'non-visual'. When the active competitor has seen the approaching competitor arrive at the checkmark, he/she will begin as though responding to the beginning weapon in a run race. The approaching competitor will call 'Hand' when he/she is in a situation to securely pass the stick to the active competitor. The active competitor returns his/her hand, the approaching competitor puts the mallet into the hand, and the trade is finished. The active competitor doesn't watch the implement into his/her hand, subsequently 'non-visual'.


BEGINNING POSITIONS


FIRST LEG


The primary competitor will utilize a run start and should alter the right-hand position to hold the implement safely.


DIFFERENT LEGS


The beginning situation for the active competitor should consider:


      • unstable beginning and a quick quickening

      • great perception of the moving toward approaching competitor


This is the beginning situation for the second and fourth leg sprinters. The third leg sprinter will remain to within the path, utilize the left hand to help the body and watch for the approaching competitor under the correct arm.


PASSING TECHNIQUES


Upsweep


The accepting hand is stretched out behind them at hip stature with the palm looking down and a wide-point between the thumb and the remainder of the fingers. The approaching competitor passes the implement in an upward development into the accepting hand.


The benefit of this technique is that this is a standard situation for the getting hand. An impediment is that it might require some control of the rod close by to make the following trade securely.


Downsweep


The getting hand is reached out behind them at hip stature with the palm looking up and a wide-point between the thumb and the remainder of the fingers. The approaching competitor passes the rod in a descending development into the accepting hand.


The upside of this technique is that it will require no control of the rod to make the following stick trade securely. A burden is that it's anything but a characteristic situation of the active competitor's hand to get the stick.


PUSH  PASS TECHNIQUE


The active sprinter's arm is reached out behind them corresponding to the ground, and the hand is unguarded with the thumb pointing down. The approaching sprinter holds the rod vertically and drives it straight out from the shadows hand.


The bit of leeway is the approaching sprinter can without much of a stretch change the cudgel's situation up, down or sideways and can notice the active sprinter's hand grab hold of the mallet. It will require no control of the mallet by the active sprinter to make the following cudgel trade securely. An inconvenience is that it's anything but a characteristic situation of the active competitor's arm and hand to get the implement. This is maybe the most secure strategy for twirly doo trade.


DETERMINATION OF COLLEAGUES


The exhibition in the transfer occasion fundamentally relies on the flawlessness of the mallet trade and the running capacity of the group. For the determination of competitors for the distinctive transfer legs, it is reasonable to discover their abilities for a specific segment (the second and third sprinter cover longer distances). It additionally is prudent to build up every competitor's maximum capacity for running segments on the straight and around the corner. These people's capacities should be considered in choosing the running request of a hand-off group, thinking about the accompanying:


The principal leg - need goes to a competitor who has a decent beginning, can run the curve and pass the stick well


The subsequent leg - the decision goes to a competitor who is positive about getting and passing the implement, runs well in the straight and has adequate speed perseverance. The competitor ought to maybe be a 200 meters trained professional.


The third leg - the determination goes to the runner who is certain and solid in accepting and passing the mallet, can run the twist well and have adequate speed perseverance. The competitor ought to maybe be a 200 meters trained professional.


The fourth leg - here we ordinarily select a sprinter who gets the twirly doo well, is effective in running the straight and has a serious level of serious soul.


GROUP REQUEST AND TRADE FOCUSES


The accompanying data on rod trade for every leg of the hand-off and group request has been given by Daniel Maas whose running resume incorporates being the 193rd American to run sub-four-minute/mile, 7 NAIA National Championships for Adams State College and 6 Events on US National groups.


In the event that there are observable differentials in the velocities of the sprinters, it tends to be a smart thought on the initial leg to trade 5 meters into the zone and afterward on the subsequent leg to trade 5 meters from the finish of the zone and afterward on the third leg 5 meters from the earliest starting point of the zone. This way your first leg sprinter goes 95 meters with the stick and hands off to your second quickest sprinter with a flying beginning. The competitor on the subsequent leg at that point runs 110 meters conveying the higher speed. The third leg sprinter is the slowest and just goes 90 meters prior to giving the twirly doo to the anchor (the quickest sprinter) to convey the stick 105 meters. With the running request of 3-2-4-1, it will boost the distance the two quickest sprinters convey the rod.


I have seen a running request of 3-1-4-2 to give your quickest competitor a flying 110 meters with the stick. I have not by and by run in a 3-1-4-2 request with differential lengths yet seen it be viable. Surely not as much at the university and tip top levels yet it very well may be powerful in secondary school where you can have huge speed differentials at every leg. I have likewise seen the group request approach utilized in the 4x400m hand-off.