Top 10 Philosophers To Follow In 2020 | Core Spirit

Top 10 Philosophers To Follow In 2020

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Some people think that philosophy has been dead for a long time. In fact, this couldn’t be more wrong. Philosophy is very much alive with very bright representatives of the industry who share their thoughts on feminism, ethics, morality and so many other burning topics.

Gregg Caruso

Gregg D. Caruso is Professor of Philosophy at SUNY Corning and Honorary Professor of Philosophy at Macquarie University. He is also the Co-Director of the Justice Without Retribution Network (JWRN) at the University of Aberdeen School of Law. His research interests include free will, agency, and responsibility (both moral and legal), as well as philosophy of mind, cognitive science, neuroethics, moral psychology, criminal law, punishment, and public policy. 

Caruso has written several books and has a Twitter account where he shares his bright thought, news and ideas.

Nigel Warburton

Founding faculty at The London Interdisciplinary School, Warburton has his own podcast Philosophy Bites. He is also a consultant editor at various magazines like Aeon, Five Books and others. Follow his Twitter account to get the latest updates in the field of philosophy.

Kate Manne

Writer and philosopher at Cornell, author of Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (2018) & Entitled: How Male Privilege Hurts Women (Crown/Penguin, Aug 2020). In her Twitter account, Manne shares some pieces from her books and her view on ongoing events in the world.

Justin Weinberg

Weinberg edits Daily Nous Twitter account. He is a philosophy professor at the University of South Carolina. Daily Nous provides information and news for and about the philosophy profession.

Dr Rani Lill Anjum

Philosopher at Norwegian University of Life Sciences Center for Applied Philosophy of Science. She works on causation and philosophical bias in science. She shares her thoughts on feminism, inequality and current events.

Dr Skye Cleary

Skye C. Cleary PhD MBA is a philosopher and author of Existentialism and Romantic Love and co-editor of How to Live a Good Life. She teaches at Columbia University, Barnard College, ThinkOlio, and previously at the City University of New York, the New York Public Library, and in a prison.

Guy Longworth

Longworth is interested in the philosophy of language, epistemology, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, history of analytical philosophy. His main research interests are testimonial knowledge transmission, the nature of knowledge of language and linguistic understanding, and the nature of first person thoughts. His other interests include: Kant; Descartes; the philosophy of language; the nature of linguistic properties; the semantics and metaphysics associated with talk about events, processes, and states; the philosophy of linguistics; the nature of perception, especially perception of speech; the history of analytical philosophy, especially the works of Austin, Chomsky, Davidson, Frege, Quine, and Russell.

Anita Leirfall

Leirfall is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Bergen. These are her main research interests:

- Immanuel Kant: space, directionality, orientation, logical/real, modality, justification, causation, determinism, agency, free will

- Metaphysics: space, time, causation, consciousness, perception

- Philosophy of Science: space, time, directionality, symmetry, causation, method of discovery/justification

- Neuroscience: capacity for spatial orientation, capacity for language, consciousness

- Ethics: free will, justice, animal welfare/rights

- Philosophy of Law

- Philosophy of Computer Games

Justin Caouette

Caouette is a philosopher at Bridgewater State University and Northeastern University. His research includes studying ethics, free will, agency, mental illness, virtues, moral psychology, moral obligation, moral responsibility.

Cliff Sosis

Sosis is a philosopher at Coastal Carolina University. He created and runs What Is It Like to Be a Philosopher? There you will find in-depth autobiographical interviews with philosophers. Interviews you can’t find anywhere else. In the interviews, you get a sense of what makes living, breathing philosophers tick. How one becomes a philosopher. The interviews show how our theories shape our lives and how our experiences influence our theories. They reveal what philosophers have in common, if anything, and what their goals are. Overall, the interviews give you a fuller picture of how the people who do philosophy work, and a better idea of how philosophy works. 

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